Flounder Fishing with my Nephew

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For the first time in over a month, I had a chance to get out on the water and do a little fishing from the kayak. I was able to take my nine year old nephew with me on this trip and we had a really good time.  He’s shown a great deal of interest in fishing lately and has been spending a lot of time catching fish from one of my parents ponds.  I figured this is as good a time as any to introduce him to both kayaking and saltwater fishing.

image1I swung by Fishing Tackle Unlimited the day before and picked up a Jackson Big Tuna (tandem kayak) for us to paddle.  For those looking at renting kayaks in the Houston area, FTU is a great place with plenty of options to choose from.

The ideal plan would have been to launch at 6 am and finish up around 10 or 11 since we are in the middle of July, but I wasn’t able to pick up my nephew until 10 am.  We made a quick stop at Bucee’s to grab a few waters and Gatorades in order to stay hydrated and continued on our way.  We arrived at our launch a little after 11 and met up with my good friend David.  We unloaded the kayaks and made our way to our flounder hole.  We arrived around noon, with temps already holding steady in the upper 90s and started looking for fish.  I started off throwing a couple of Buggs rigged tandem and picked up a solid 19″ flounder to start the day.

image3We moved around quite a bit until we found where the flat fish were holding.  I watched my nephew bring a few flounder to the surface before they spit the hook at him and dove back down.  Premature hook sets were the cause of the missed fish, but that was to be expected on a young boys first flounder trip since his initial reaction after each strike was to immediately set the hook.  After an hour or so he finally got one to commit and landed his first flounder.

The bite wasn’t hot and heavy, but we caught a fish every 15 – 20 minutes.  By the time four o’clock hit, we had a decent stringer of fish and needed to get out of the sun.  4″ white Gulp Swimming Mullet on 1/4 oz jighead produced the majority of our bites by slowly working them along a drop off from about 2 to 8 feet in depth.

My nephew tried to convince me to push further back into the marsh in search of redfish, but the wind was blowing every bit of 15 mph with gusts to 20.  I didn’t have the energy to battle the wind for several miles, but promised him we’d make another trip in the fall when big schools are roaming the marsh.

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