Posts Tagged With: cyprus hooked

Hook Spit Lone Star Kayak Series (Event #1 2015)

2015-04-19 08.12.10

I know its been a while since my last blog post, but unfortunately, that trend will continue for a while.  My wife and I are less than a month away from the arrival of our 2nd child, so fishing trips have been few and far between, and time to write or do anything else fishing related has been difficult to come by.  We’re excited about the arrival of our new little one though, which should happen sometime in mid May.

The first event of the Lone Star Kayak Series was held this past weekend and man was it a big one.  The largest event last year occurred during the first event in April and included 91 anglers.  With the tournament continuing to grow in popularity each year, we had high hopes of breaking the 100 angler mark for the first time ever.  When registration was finally shut down, we couldn’t believe what we were seeing.  176 anglers had registered for the first event of the season which nearly doubled the previous best mark.

With tourney day quickly approaching, I decided to take off work on Friday to try and locate a few fish.  I’m not a big fan of fishing the day before a tournament, but the location I chose was based off of past experiences and current weather conditions.  I had no clue if the fish would be around and wanted to check it out before showing up the next morning.

We’ve had rain for nearly two weeks straight leading up to this event, and most areas were running extremely fresh as far as salinity goes. On top of that, we had pretty strong SE winds that were causing our tides to run about a foot higher than predicted.  I would much rather fish a really low tide than an extremely high one, but that wasn’t going to happen this day.

I launched around 7:00 am on Friday morning and made the one mile paddle to the spot I planned to fish. I only spent about 2 hours fishing, but caught a decent 27″ red, missed another, and also caught an 18″ rat red all while using a Midcoast Popping Cork (Texas Swing) with a New Penny Gulp Mantis Shrimp.  Only one good fish was caught, but it at least let me know there were a few in the area.  I made it back to the truck around 10 and was on the road headed home.

2015-04-17 08.16.24

 

My alarm went of at 3:15 am on Saturday morning and I was on the road by 3:30.  After a quick stop at Bucee’s where I met up with David and saw a few other friends, we were on our way to the launch, breakfast burritos in hand.  We arrived around 5:30 and unloaded our gear with plenty of time to spare.  The phone alarm went off at 6:00 am and we pushed off a few seconds later doing the best to leave the mosquitos behind.

We reached our first spot around 6:30 as first light began to show.  We could hear bait being smashed along the grass lines and thought for sure we had chosen the perfect spot.  We both worked the edges of the grass with corks and gulp, but neither of us ever got a bite.  The feeding frenzy was short lived at around 15 minutes, before going completely quiet.  We continued working the grass lines with the exceptionally high tides before working a couple of drains with only one rat red by David to show for our efforts.

After a few hours of solid cork popping and no bites, I decided to move around and check out some other areas.  I made a short paddle to another lake and worked the grass lines first, followed by a narrow channel that runs through the small lake, and then the shell in the middle with no bites.  I was about to head back toward David but decided to cork a small drain where a few small baitfish were flipping.  A few seconds after casting into the drain my cork shot under and I was rewarded with a 23″ red.  Not quiet the one I was looking for, but it gave me a fish on the stringer, which is always a good feeling on tournament day.

After stringing that fish, I started hearing feeding fish over my shoulder where a series of endless islands and channels were weaving in and out of each other for a good half mile.  I started working my way through the drains, hearing bait getting busted about every minute or so.  I had difficulty locating exactly where the feeding was taking place while sitting down, so I decided to stand and pole.  Once standing, seeing where the commotion came from was easy to spot.  I stuck with the cork and gulp, making casts into the areas where the bait had been hit, and then making small pops of the cork to draw some attention to my bait.  After several casts that I thought for sure would yield bites went untouched, I decided to switch lures.

I had started getting glimpses of the bait being hit and they were very tiny shrimp about a inch in size.  I snipped off my topwater, tied on a 1/4 oz. Curl Tail Bugg (Hot Pink), and made a cast into the area where bait had just scattered.  The Bugg hit the water, I gave it one twitch, and the redfish unloaded on it.  I landed this fish in about 10 seconds due to the fact that it ran into the grass, causing it to become stuck.  I picked up the fish and thought I had just hit the jackpot.  After stringing the fish, and laying it on the Checkit Stick, I quickly realized that my fish was going to be out of the slot.  Once I pinched its tail, it measured 28 1/4″ which put it 1/4″ over the slot.  It was a tough blow going from a 13 lb. stringer, back down to 4.73 lb. because of 1/4″, but thats how tournament fishing goes.

2015-04-18 08.15.11

 

I worked the area a little longer, but just like earlier in the day, the bite died off after about 20 minutes.  I made my way back to David to let him know about the two fish I had landed and continued working the area near him.  I picked up an undersized red and extremely fat 22″ trout before I decided to head back to the area where the previous fish were caught.

We made our way to the small lake where I had caught my 23″ red and stopped to fish a small flat near a drain.  I was halfway through with a story about how a friend and I had caught a good number of reds on this flat our first trip to this area several years ago when David’s Pink She Dog was annihilated by what sounded like an extremely large fish.  I paddled away from him to make sure his fish didn’t tangle up with my kayak and returned 5 minutes later to check out his fish.  He asked me to give him a 2nd opinion on the length because he was having some difficulty determining if the fish was right at, or barely over 28″.  After a pinch of the tail it was clear that his fish was 28 1/8″ in length giving David the same heart break I had experienced just an hour earlier.

2015-04-18 11.12.55

 

We continued working the area but knew we were running short on time.  On our way back to the truck, David picked up a 24″ red on the same She Dog which meant he wouldn’t be going to the weighin empty handed.  I desperately tried picking up a second fish and thought I had succeeded when my She Dog was hit hard less than half a mile from the truck.  To my surprise, it was another extremely fat trout.

2015-04-18 13.31.22

 

We made it back to the truck and headed to the weighin to discover that some monster weights were holding down first and second place.  Joe Strahan from the Saltwater Boys Kayak Fishing Club out of the Beaumont area had 18.25 lb., which included his 1/2 lb. live bonus.  Closely behind him was another SWBKFC teammate, Brent Louviere with 17.15 lb. (1/2 lb. bonus included).  More than 100 kayakers checked in at the weighin and 62 anglers weighed in fish.  My 23″ redfish put me in 57th place while David’s 24″ red had him finish in 52nd.  Definitely not the places or fish we were looking for, but we’ll be back again in June, hopefully with better results.  Joe’s winning fish are pictured below.

Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

1st Place: Joe Strahan – Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

We all had a great time at the weighin and I enjoyed seeing good friends on stage receiving their prizes and cash.  Registration is already open for the 2nd event on June 6th, and hopefully we have another great turnout.  Anyone interested in reading up on the rules, seeing past results and pics, or wanting to register can do so by visiting http://www.lonestarkayakseries.com

Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

I would like to thank Jackson Kayak, Werner Paddles, Hook Spit Performance Rods, Buggs Fishing Lures, and FishHide Sportswear for all of their support.  I have been blessed with opportunity to use and promote these great products and look forward to a continued partnership for years and years to come.

Conditions:

Wind: Non existent at times, 20 mph at others

Weather: Cloudy skies with temps around the mid 80s (never saw the sun)

Tides: 1 foot above predicted, high, and not moving

Bottom: Mud and Shell

Depth: Anywhere from 1-5 feet deep

Lures: 1/8th oz. Buggs Curl Tail Jig (Hot Pink), She Dog (Red Head, White Body, Chrome Back), and MidCoast Popping Cork with Gulp Mantis Shrimp

Rod: 6′ 10″ Hook Spit T-N-T and 7′ 2″ Hook Spit Zephyr Elite

Reel: Shimano Citica and Daiwa Ballistic EX 2500H

Kayak: Jackson Cuda 14

Paddle: 250 cm Werner Cyrpus: Hooked

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

First Kayak Trip of 2015

Grant and I made a trip to Galveston yesterday to explore a new area and try and locate some fish.  I have virtually scouted this spot many times with Google Earth but always seem to talk myself out of making the long paddle that is required to reach and fish it.  The winds were predicted to stay relatively low and the temperature was going to climb into the mid 60s by noon so this was as good a day as any to put in some miles.

The plan was to search for trout on the way out but they weren’t really around.  Once we made the 5 mile paddle to our intended destination we focused on a deeper channel for the first few hours before moving over to the nearby mud/shell mix.  We had no luck in the channels, mainly due to the fact that by the time we reached it the sun was straight overhead, quickly heating the mud/shell mix and the water around it.  The reds had moved out of the deeper water and were sitting pretty shallow when we found them.  All of our fish were within close proximity to the deeper water (4-8 feet deep) sitting in about 2 feet of water with a soft mud bottom covered with a small amount of scattered shell.  This has been a constant pattern all winter long that will continue over the next month or two.  Find the mud shell/mix near deeper water, and you find the fish.

This was one of those days when I kayak you can stand in was key to catching fish.  While sitting, the fish were difficult to spot.  While standing, you could see them about 10-12 yards away and make a short pitch to them for an immediate hookup.  All fish were sight casted and were between 23 and 26 inches. Grant did manage to pull one that was a little over 30 inches for our largest of the day.  We also picked up a few trout where the deeper water met up with the shallow stuff and I spotted a 35″  black drum that was not interested in my trout killer.  All fish were released to fight another day.  Enjoy the video above since I didn’t take any pics on this trip.

Conditions:

Wind: 5 mph from North switching out of the east around noon

Weather: Mid 60s with sunny skies.

Tides: Outgoing until noon and then incoming

Bottom: Mud & shell mix

Visibility: Crystal clear

Depth: 2 feet but near channels that were 4-8 feet deep

Lure: Texas Trout Killer on a 1/4th oz jig head (Plum White)

Rod: 6′ 9″ Hook Spit Pitch Fork

Reel: Shimano Citica

Kayak: Jackson Cuda 14

Paddle: 250 cm Werner Cyrpus: Hooked

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , ,

Lone Star Kayak Series 2014 Event #4

10414401_764473163625278_1830637954459586192_n

The 2014 Lone Star Kayak Series came to an end this past weekend with the final event of the season being held on October 4th. I have been mostly absent from the water since the last event back in August with only one trip made between the two events. Work, family, and other events have occupied my time over the past month and a half making it difficult to get on the water. I had no clue where I would go but got an invite from Jared to join him. He had been on some pretty good fish the past couple of weeks, plus fishing with friends is more enjoyable than fishing alone.

My morning didn’t start off quiet like I had planned. My alarm went off and I was up brushing my teeth without even needing to hit snooze. While brushing my teeth I recieved a text from David telling me that he was going to be late. He was up late as the administrator on duty at a football game the night before which caused him to get home late and wake up late. I didn’t really understand why he would be late considering we live about the same distance from our launch. A few minutes later my phone rang and it was another friend that I had planned on meeting at Bucee’s for breakfast. I asked him what he was up to as I answered the phone and he told me that he had just pulled into Bucee’s but didn’t see me around. At that point I looked at my clock and realized I had set my alarm for 4:40 instead of 3:40. I had an hour and twenty minutes to get to the launch, unload, and be ready to push off at 6:00 with a long drive ahead of me. I hung up the phone with Aaron, rushed downstairs, threw my kayak in the truck, and was on the road by 4:50. The launch is a good hour and fifteen minutes from my house while driving around or slightly below the speed limit. I drove a few miles over the posted limits and decided not to stop for breakfast. I knew that if I hurried I would be able to launch on time or just shortly after. I arrived at the launch at 5:50 and with a little help from Jared I was unloaded and ready to go by 5:57. So I actually got an extra hour of sleep but had to skip breakfast which I wasn’t a fan of. I knew I would be covering close to 10 miles on this day in high winds so not having any fuel had me a little worried.

We launched right at 6 am and started to make the 2 mile paddle to the spot we planned to fish. Winds were predicted to be 20-25 miles per hour but could not have been more calm on our paddle out. We made our way through the dark, checking the phone GPS on occasion to make sure we were headed in the right direction. We reached our spot as soon as first light appeared and started looking for fish. We fished a small channel that connects two large lakes while waiting for the sun to rise a little. The channel is 6-8 feet deep in the middle but only 2-3 feet deep on the edges with lots of shell.

I started off throwing a she dog while my popping cork with gulp drifted 20 feet behind me. This is a great way to increase the chances of catching a fish if you’re fishing a tournament where two rods in the water at the same time is allowed. As you drift and cast in front of you, the popping cork with gulp floats behind you making it an easy meal for a redfish that happens to be passing by at the right time.

Screen Shot 2014-10-11 at 4.04.11 PM

I picked up my first red on the she dog after about 15 minutes of casting parallel with the shoreline bringing the lure along the edge of the grass. The fish was a little over 20″ but I strung it anyway. A few cast later and another fish takes my topwater, this time it was just a small trout. I continued my drift and met up with Jared who was about 50 yards ahead of me to find out that he had landed a solid 26″ red on his popping cork. We kept moving without much luck and decided to move into the larger lake and work the grass line with the corks. Just before turning into the lake Jared decided to work his cork off the point of a small island with scattered shell and it payed off. He landed a solid 27″ red to give him 13+ lbs. on the day. We set up our drift and worked the grass line in the big lake without much luck until I came across a small pod of 8-10 reds coming towards me. I already had my popping cork in hand so I made a cast 10 feet in front of their path and waited a few seconds for them to cross paths with the gulp. Sure enough, the cork disappeared and I had a fish on. This one went 23″ so on the stringer it went. This fish was not exactly what I was looking for but the winds were picking up to their originally predicted speeds and I wanted to make sure that I at least came in with two fish, regardless of size.

Screen Shot 2014-10-11 at 4.00.51 PM

We continued our drift and came across another small pod of reds 5 minutes later. I pulled my rod with a soft plastic into my lap and prepared for a double hook up. The plan was to cast the cork 15 feet in front of the pods path and place it in the rod holder. Once it was secure I was going to use my soft plastic rod and make a cast into the pod when they were a few feet from my gulp. The plan never worked because the fish made a hard left turn 5 feet before reaching my cork and started heading towards the middle of the lake. I fired a cast into the middle of them before they hit the deeper water and caught another 23″ red so the 20″ red I had caught first was released.

Screen Shot 2014-10-11 at 4.03.07 PM

At this point the wind had really kicked it up a notch so we decided to head back to our little channel and work it over. The quarter mile paddle back was tough but we arrived and started corking the channel along with David, who had arrived shortly before us. We weren’t having any luck near the channel so I decided to drift with the wind while working a slightly protected shoreline. I didn’t think two 23″ fish would do me much good so this was a risk I needed to take, even if it meant paddling back directly into the wind for several miles. I worked the shallow shoreline with scattered shell for several miles picking up 3 more reds along the way with the popping cork and gulp. Unfortunately, they were all 23″ like my others so I wasn’t able to upgrade.

I had reached the end of my drift and had the horrible task of making the 4 mile paddle back to the truck directly into the 25-30 mph wind while dragging two fish. I started my paddle at 11:00 and paddled nonstop for 2 hours and 45 minutes arriving back at the launch at 1:45. I was completely exhausted, especially since I didn’t get to eat breakfast that morning, but was glad to be back on dry land. The Werner Cyprus: Hooked I am fortunate enough to paddle with was a lifesaver on this day. It was a good reminder on why a quality paddle is a must have for kayak anglers. David and Jared had headed back to the trucks as I started my long drift and had already arrived at the weighin. David caught two fish near 23″ and another friend fishing the area reported catching 6 fish, but all were 23″ as well. Between the four of us, we caught 20 fish, with Jared’s two largest fish being the only ones that weren’t in the 23″ range.

10485307_764473986958529_5538443378246092467_n

After a short drive I arrived at Louis and weighed in my fish. I wasn’t expecting to be in the money with my two small fish but squeaked into the last money spot with an 18th place finish out of 74 anglers. That’s one of the great things about the LSKS, they pay out to the top 25% of the field which always gives you a decent shot at winning your entry fee back. Congrats to Chih Tien who took first place for the event while Jared held on to claim 3rd place giving him a nice cash payout and a trophy of the house.

Photo Oct 04, 5 53 32 PM

Photo Oct 04, 5 49 20 PM

 

Photo Oct 04, 5 49 45 PM

With this being the final event of the year, an Angler of the Year would be crowned once the prizes and trophies for this event were handed out. There was no surprise this year as Jason Blackwell dominated the overall points with 2nd, 4th, 1st, and 2nd place finishes during the four events this year. This makes him the back to back champion since he won AOY last year as well.

Photo Oct 04, 5 57 22 PM

 

10680090_10153216539509447_1978467480899966078_o

I finished 5th overall for Angler of the Year which matched my best finish from two years ago and Jared moved up to 6th place overall. I’m looking forward to next seasons events with the fact that we are growing every year in both sponsors and participants. A big thanks goes out to Werner Paddles for supplying my paddles and Hook Spit Performance Rods for my rods and clothing.  If anyone is interested in the LSKS, you can read more about it by visiting the link below.

 

http://www.lonestarkayakseries.com

 

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Lone Star Kayak Series 2014 Event #3

image_1

Photo Credit: Joe Winston

Yesterday I fished the 3rd leg of the Lone Star Kayak Series and found a couple of nice fish. I had the chance to prefish both Tuesday and Wednesday with absolutely no luck at finding tournament quality fish. On Tuesday I put in a good 12 miles and only managed one lower slot red with the same results on Wednesday with a trout in the mix. A friend that doesn’t fish often joined me on Wednesday and did manage to catch his first redfish from a kayak and on topwater nonetheless.

Photo Aug 13-2

T-Bone with a topwater red

It wasn’t until Wednesday evening when I finally chose an area to fish. I hadn’t fished this area since early July so I was taking a chance, hoping to get somewhat lucky. I spoke with a friend who fishes the area often and he said the fish were there but the bite had been difficult all summer long. He said I could probably pull at least two fish from the area around 13 lbs. if I worked the area thoroughly. At the time, I had no clue just how right he was.

My day started with a 2:45 alarm, followed by the snooze button, and another alarm five minutes later. I was out of bed, dressed, and on the road by 3:00 to meet a couple of friends at Whataburger. Each of us had planned on fishing within a few miles of each other so a few taquitos and caffeine were needed if we were going to make it through a long day of fishing. We enjoyed our breakfast and hit the road only to get stuck behind a few eighteen-wheelers pulling a wide load 30 mph with a police escort that wouldn’t let anyone pass. We each had about 40 miles to go before reaching our launches, which meant we were going to miss out on launching at the designated time of 6 am. Using my phone I located a side street that ran parallel with the road we were traveling on. With a little luck I figured I could possibly get around the trucks and resume the posted speed of 70 mph. I turned off the highway, raced down the back roads, and just beat the police escort. I contacted the other guys to see if they had followed but they had not and were still puttin along at 30 mph. I hadn’t lost much time and estimated that I would be able to launch at 6 am per tourney rules. I reached my launch in time to unload my gear and pull my kayak to the edge of the water with 5 minutes to spare. The predicted 5 mph SW wind was actually around 15 mph, which was causing small white caps to form on the open lake and crash into the shoreline.  My two friends honked as they drove by which meant they had finally gotten around the wide load convoy and would have to launch shortly after 6, but only by 15 minutes.

6 am arrived and I hopped in my kayak and started paddling out. The first part of my trip required me to paddle directly into the wind, which proved to be pretty difficult. I scrapped my original plan of traveling a mile or so down the shoreline before entering the marsh and entered at the first opportunity for a little protection from the wind. Once inside, the 5-foot tall reeds, grass, and occasional tree made the wind feel almost non-existent. I made my way through the first lake looking for signs of fish while stopping at the occasional drain or island to throw out the popping cork with gulp with no success. It wasn’t long before I located several schools of dime sized button shad getting hammered by several dozen redfish. The small baitfish were going airborne all over the place and I started thinking that I may be able to string two fish before 7 am which is always a relief on tourney day regardless of size. I started off by throwing the popping cork with gulp in the middle of several schools of shad and just let it just sit. There was no need to pop the cork because the fish were within 5 feet of it, which had me thinking they would find it based on the scent alone. After about 10 minutes and several casts into areas with actively feeding fish but no hook ups I decided to start giving an occasional pop with no luck either. I decided to go with a soft plastic next and after another 10 minutes and dozens of casts, I still hadn’t hooked a fish. The she pup was next, followed but a Manns 1-Minus, followed by a Bugg. No matter what I threw, the reds didn’t care. They were keyed in on these dime-sized shad and didn’t want anything else. After an hour of working the area over hard with nothing to show for it I decided to move on. I continued the same pattern as before, slowly moving from small lake to small lake stopping at each drain and popping the cork before moving on. I had the occasional fish blowout near the kayak while paddling but hadn’t reached the area I had wanted to fish. I finally arrived at the lake I had been trying to reach. I had fished this lake a few times in the past with good luck and liked the layout and structure which consisted of a mud bottom with a little bit of grass and an average depth of a foot and a half. It also had several drains feeding into it with a few pinches and islands along the way. I spotted/heard several nice blowups as I entered the lake and decided to put the popping cork down and got with the trusty black and chrome she pup with an orange belly. I drifted across the lake making several casts while slowly making my way towards the blowups I had been seeing and hearing. I finally reached the area, which was located out in front of a small drain that led to another lake. By this time the tide had started falling and you could see the water pushing through the pinch that connected the two lakes with a little help from the wind. I turned sidesaddle in my Cuda 14 and began crab walking the area while fan casting towards the drain. After a dozen casts I had a good blowup that didn’t quiet connect. I made another cast into the same area and had another good blowup followed by a fish that finally connected. Unfortunately for me, the fish pulled off after 10 seconds, which made me mutter a few curse words under my breath. I continued working the area and finally connected with another fish after a good 30 casts. This time, the fish was hooked well and made it to the net. I didn’t even measure the fish at the time because I knew it was in the slot and wanted to get my lure back in the water ASAP. I worked the area for another 30 minutes with another few blowup but nothing to show for it. I finally decided to move on and search for more fish. The occasional bait being busted had slowed down some and I needed to find another fish.

I continued pushing deeper in the marsh repeating my pattern of looking and listening as I slowly paddle while throwing my cork or topwater at fishy areas (drains, islands, channels, etc.) but couldn’t find a second fish. I passed by a decent sized gator as the rain started to fall and kept a close eye on his location. The last thing I wanted was to bring in half a fish because an alligator had spotted an easy meal. There was no lightning with the rain so I fished through it and located a few crawlers along one shoreline. They were all super spooky and would shoot off to deeper water as soon as I made a cast or twitched my lure. I continued pushing deeper and deeper into the marsh. I finally reached the last lake and found the same thing I had found in the first lake earlier that morning. Thousands of button shad were exploding throughout the lake as the redfish were having a feeding frenzy. I didn’t feel too confident in getting a fish here but figured this would be my best chance. The fish were there and I just needed one lucky bite. The she pup had worked earlier so I decided to stick with it. I had plenty of choices between the open lake, along the shoreline, or in front of a small drain because the little balls of bait were everywhere. I decided to go with the drain because some of the larger crashes and occasional airborne reds looked bigger than the others. I was also hoping the drain would provide slightly deeper water, which would benefit my topwater some. I setup about 20 yards off of several bait balls and began working them with the she pup. I would make a cast 10 yards past the balls of bait and walk the dog right through the middle of them. The whole time the reds and shad are flying all over the place but nothing seemed to care about my lure. I would cast between the four bait balls within my reach and repeat. After a good 50 cast I finally hooked into a fish that came off after about 15 seconds followed by more muttered curse words. Fifty casts later I had a great blowup that shot my she pup a good 5 feet in the air but didn’t receive a follow up strike. Another 50 casts and I had my lure absolutely clobbered. I worked the fish for a good 2 minutes uttering “please don’t come off, please don’t come off” over and over. I never really saw the fish but knew it was a solid one from the amount of drag it had pulled. I finally got it close enough to the kayak, slid the net under it, and was pleasantly surprised when I lifted the net from the water. I knew I had a solid fish, as long as it stayed in the slot. I strung the fish and with a deep breath, laid it across the check-it stick, pinched the tailed saw that it was a hair over 27″ but easily under 28″. Stringing that second fish on tourney day is always a huge relief, especially when it’s a fish of that size. I took this time measure my first fish and it was a solid fish that was a little over 25″. I checked the clock and noticed I still had time for a possible upgrade. I worked the same area again with a few more blowups but nothing connected. I decided to start heading back to the truck since I had to paddle about four miles while dragging two fish. I looked for signs of fish along the way but the marsh had seemed to settle down some.

Photo Aug 16

Grind Terminal Tackle Stringers with fish

It took a while but I finally reached the truck and loaded up.  I started heading for Galveston with plenty of time to reach Louis, weighin my fish, and visit with friends. I talked to three different friends along the way and found out one had about 15 lbs. and two others were around 13 lbs. which is about what I thought I had. When it was all said and done places 2-5 were separated by less than .60 lb. Jason Blackwell took first with 15.2 lbs., Aaron Ferguson was second with 13.93 lbs., and I finished third with 13.63 lbs. Another friend (Scott Tilley) finished on my heels with 13.47 lbs.  The paddle of choice this day was the 250 cm Werner Cyprus: Hooked.  I received this paddle a few months ago and have been using it on every trip since then.  At 24.5 ounces of full carbon its an amazing resource on days when double digit miles are reached.

 

 

Photo Aug 16-5

Top 3

It was another great tournament and as always, great to hang out with old friends and meet a few new ones. Dustin, his wife, and the other workers that help out do an outstanding job of keeping the tournament very competitive and fun for everyone. My prize package for third place included $290 cash, a trophy, castaway rod, a bottle of Silver Star Whiskey, and a goody bag full of a few different yak gear products, and bass assassin soft plastics. The two guys that finished ahead of me are good friends that I have the pleasure of fishing with on occasion so to be on stage with them holding our trophies made the day extra special. I’m already looking forward to the October tournament, which is by far my favorite event of the four.

IMG_0575

Sonny Mills – 3rd Place – Photo Credit: Michael Harris

 

Photo Aug 16

Aaron Ferguson – 2nd Place

 

Photo Aug 16-2

Jason Blackwell – 1st Place

 

Photo Aug 16-6

Prize Winners

 

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Blog at WordPress.com.