Posts Tagged With: Kayak Fishing

2016 Lone Star Kayak Series Event #4

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Well, the 2016 season of the Lone Star Kayak Series has finally come to an end.  Going into the last event of the season I was in a 3 way tie for first, followed closely by two others that were behind us by 3 and 5 points.

I started the morning off by alternating between throwing a MirrOlure She Dog and popping cork with gulp.  I would throw the topwater along the shorelines the majority of the time with an occasional toss towards the middle of a lake and grab my cork rod anytime I approached a drain or pinch.  It took a while, but I finally had a 23″ red suck down my topwater near the back of a small cove.  Not quiet the fish I was looking for, but it gave me a fish on the stringer early with plenty of time to upgrade.  The next 5 hours were a grind.  I worked big lakes, small lakes, channels, back coves, and everything in between with only a rat red and dink trout to show for my efforts.

If there’s one thing I’ve learned this year, it’s to never give up on tournament day.  During the second event this year, my only fish of the day came with about 20 minutes of rising time left.  The same thing happened during the 3rd event.  I fished all morning without a single fish, only to find 15 lbs. right before making it to the truck and placing second.  I was hoping for another miracle on this day and kept moving around, hoping to find a second fish.

We were down to our final hour of fishing when I heard a large splash way back in the grass of a large lake I was in.  I stood up in my kayak to get a better view and noticed a really small marsh pond about 15 yards back in the grass.  The only way in was through a very small channel that was about the width of my kayak.  I thought to myself, “There’s no way a fish is back there”.  I forced my way down the channel, entered the small pond, and stood up for a better view.  At that point I spotted an upper slot red cruising the shoreline, reached down for my rod, and fired a Bass Assassin 4″ Sea Shad (Color: Fried Chicken) in his path and he jumped on it.  The pond was small and the fish went berserk, using ever square inch of the pond to try and escape before finally hitting the net.  It measured 27 1/4″ and was just what I was looking for.  I had about 45 minutes left to upgrade my last fish, but that fish never came.

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I made it back to the truck, loaded up the kayak, and hauled butt to the weighin.  I knew I had a small chance for AOY, all depending on how the others did.  After arriving, I saw that Jared Esley had 14.06 pounds, which was going to make it close.  In the end I had 12.59 lbs with 4 anglers separating the two of us.  This caused me to end up 2 points behind him, finishing 6th place for the day and 2nd place for angler of the year.

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It was another fun year of tournament fishing, and just like in previous years, I learned a lot and grew as an angler.  I’m already looking forward to next year where I’ll work on making another run at AOY.

As always, a big thanks goes out to all the companies out there that support me and help make all this possible.

| Werner Paddles | Hook Spit Performance Rods | Buggs Fishing Lures | Viking Kayaks |

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University of Houston Cougar Saltwater Open

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This past weekend I had a chance to fish the kayak division of the University of Houston Cougar Saltwater Open.  Prizes were being awarded to the heaviest redfish, flounder, and trout in both the boat and kayak division.  They also had a heavy stringer award that would go to the angler with the heaviest stringer consisting of three redfish, trout, or flounder (only one red allowed).  This category was between both boat fisherman and kayakers.

After giving it some thought, I decided to try for a slam to see if I could win multiple categories in the kayak division.  My plan was to fish for my trout early, load up between 10-11, and head to a different spot for a redfish and flounder.

Tournament rules allowed you to launch whenever you wanted, but you couldn’t make your first cast until 6:00 am.  Grant and I launched around 5:15, reached our spot by 5:40, and sat around for 20 minutes just waiting for 6 am to hit.  As soon as it did, we started casting.  Grant went with his trusty pink Skitterwalk, which has landed him more big trout than I can count, while I started off with a bone super spook jr.  Winds were low and the bay was calm, so I went with the smaller, quieter topwater.

RedfishIt didn’t take more than 15 minutes before I had my first hook up which spit my lure after a short fight.  5 minutes later I netted my first trout, a decent 18″ fish.  I kept working parallel to the drop off I was near with a few more blowups, but no hook ups.  It didn’t take long for the wind to pick up a little and put a little chop to the water.  I grabbed my second rod with a Speckled Trout patterned One Knocker Spook and continued working the area.  With the added chop, I switched lures because I wanted one that was slightly larger and a little noisier.

It didn’t take long before I hooked up with a solid trout that succeeded in hanging me up on the bottom and escaping.  I was unable to get my lure back, so after breaking my line, I tied on a Bone colored One Knocker.  It was around 8:00 am by now, and the blowups and hookups had slowed down quiet a bit.  It had been nearly 3o minutes since I’d had any action when my lure was sucked down by a good fish.  It turned out to be a really fat 21+ inch trout, which gave me two trout in the fish bag.

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The wind continued to gain speed, which caused small white caps to start appearing on the water.  I decided to switch lures once more, and tied on a black/silver/orange MirrOlure She Dog.  The She Dog and One Knocker are similar in size, but the She Dog makes a little more noise.

Grant and I decided to leave the drop-off and fish some submerged grass in hopes of catching some redfish, and completing our three fish stringers.  However, all we found were more trout.  I netted my 3rd and 4th trout of the day over the grass and decided it was time to head back to the truck and look for some reds.

I reached the truck around 11:00, loaded up, and made the short drive to my redfish hole and launched again.  I started off throwing the She Dog with no luck, and decided to switch over to the trusty popping cork.  In the past, I’ve thrown nothing but Gulp under my cork, but have been using an Egret Baits Vudu Shrimp for the past couple of weeks with good results.  The vudu shrimp is tough, and so far, I’ve caught about a dozen reds on the same one, with no signs of wear or tear.  It’s also less likely to attract smaller trash fish, and doesn’t seem to catch less fish than Gulp with its scent.

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It took about 20 minutes but I finally boated my first red, a 17″ rat, which of course did me no good.  Five minutes later, I had a redfish attack my cork and take it under.  He quickly realized that it wasn’t something worth eating, and released it a few seconds later.  I gave it a gentle pop, and he turned on it and came back and grabbed the vudu shrimp this time.  He fought hard for several minutes before finally hitting the net.  I threw him on the check-it stick and he measured a hair over 26 inches, which I decided was good enough for me.

 

I had decent fish for two of the three species, so decided to make one last stop to see if I could grab me a flounder.  The flounder bite never came, but not for lack of trying.  I drug the bottom of my flounder spot with a tandem rigged pair of Gulp Swimming Mullet, but they didn’t want to play.  I picked up a few more trout, but they were all smaller than my previous fish.  I was satisfied with the fish I had, so decided to head over to the weighin.

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When it was all said and done, I had won big redfish and big trout honors in the kayak division.  My prize included two wooden trophies and two Bison 25 quart Coolers.  It seemed like most other kayakers had a rough day on the water, because not many fish were weighed in by them.

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My stringer fell a couple pounds short of the powerboat guys, do to the fact that my trout could not compete with theirs, even though I had the biggest red of the tournament.

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It was a fun day on the water, with a nice challenge of catching a slam during a tournament, instead of just targeting one species all day.  I’ll definitely be back next year to fish this event again.

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Conditions:

Wind: Started off calm, but reached 12-15 mph

Weather: Sunny with temps around 90 degrees

Tides: Incoming in the morning, then slack for the rest of the day

Bottom: Quick drop-off and grass while going after trout, then soft mud for the redfish

Depth: 3-5 feet deep while trout fishing and 2 feet deep for the reds

Lures: Bomber Paradise Popper with Egret Baits Vudu Shrimp, super spook jr, One Knocker Spook, and MirrOlure She Dog

Rod and Reel: Cork – Daiwa Ballistic EX 2500 on a 7′ 2″ Hook Spit Zephyr Elite and Top Water – Shimano Curado HG on a 6′ 9″ Hook Spit Recon

Kayak: Wilderness Tarpon 140

Paddle: 250 cm Werner Cyrpus: Hooked

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Spring Break Marsh Trip

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One of the perks of being a teacher is having long breaks away from work throughout the year.  Spring break is one of those times, so David and I decided to squeeze in a midweek trip . Since we live pretty close to one another, we decided to meet up at his house and ride together. We made the traditional stop at Bucee’s to get a little breakfast before making it down to the coast.

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We ended up launching around 7:15 am and began the day throwing topwaters against the grasslines and over large patches of grass without much luck. We could see bait moving around, but none of it seemed to be fleeing for its life. Once we made it to the shallow stuff, we were blowing out redfish every 10 yards or so, but not one of them were interested in our lures.

Even though we weren’t getting any bites, there were fish in the area, so we decided to grind it out in hopes that we would eventually convince a few to eat or that they would all turn on and begin feeding. After two hours of throwing tops, plastics, spoons, buggs, and everything else on the kayak, David finally sight casted a redfish that was crawling along the grass lines with a Bugg. About 5 minutes later, I spotted one on the shoreline doing the same thing and made a cast at the fish. My Bugg landed on the edge of the grass, but came out and landed near the fish. He turned on my bugg, made me think that he ate it, but succeeded in fooling me.

While David and I were discussing our plan of attack, I picked up a 22″ marsh trout after seeing a small tern that was pretty interested in a certain section of the water. After a few pics, we continued working the shorelines and that turned out to be the trick. The fish that were 10+ yards off the shorelines were not interested in our lures at all, but the ones cruising along the grass were hungry enough for us to get a handful of bites. We decided to split up in order to maximize the amount of the grass lines we could work and meet back up later.

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I sent David a text an hour later to let him know that I had caught my limit of reds. He said he was 1 fish short of a limit and had lost a couple that would have completed it. I worked my way back towards him and picked up a few more fish along with way by continuing to focus on the grass lines. When I finally caught back up with David, he had strung his 3rd red and had caught a few extra as well. We explored the area a bit more and finally decided to call it a day. We were still spooking fish that were laid up, but they just weren’t interested enough in eating for us to continue grinding it out.

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I caught my trout on a 1/4 oz. Curl Tail Bugg in Electric Chicken and the reds came off of a 1/4 oz. Curl Tail in Blue Crab (My all time favorite color). David caught a few of his on buggs and a few on paddle tails.

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Long Time, No See

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It’s been about 3 months since the last time my kayak touched water. Work, my kids, and other obligations kept me off the water during the really cold months, so I was badly needing a little saltwater therapy.

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David and I met up at Bucee’s for breakfast before making it to the launch around 6:45. We unloaded quickly and made the short paddle to the spot we planned to fish. With the warmer weather and low tides, we had high hopes of spending the day sight casting our fish. The problem was, 99% of the fish we came across were laid up and not moving. The only way we knew they were around, was by the insane amount of mud boils that kept popping up in front of us. We took our time, fan casting the area near all the mud boils and caught a handful of fish. We only seemed to get bites when we made a lucky cast, that happened to land on the fishes head, causing a reaction strike out of fear.

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After a while, we decided to cover some water, to see if we could find a few fish that were more active, since these were being stubborn. Later in the day, we ended up finding a few fish that were actively feeding along the shoreline, but the action didn’t last too long.

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Soft mud and partially exposed patches of shell were the key to locating fish. The only lures we caught them on were the Buggs 1/4 oz. Beastie Bugg (New Penny) and Buggs 1/4 oz. Curl Tail (Black Gold). Later that evening, while cleaning fish, I found a few 1″ mud minnows in their stomachs, which explained why the Buggs worked so well, when the cork, topwater, spinner bait, and soft plastic didn’t.

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Although I haven’t fished much over the last several months, I have stayed busy with fishing related activities.

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I spent one night speaking to the Houston chapter of the Saltwater Boys Kayak Fishing Club at the new Sugarland Fishing Tackle Unlimited. My speech was titled “Blind Casting the Marsh with 20/20 Vision”, which is an article that I have been working on for some time now. A few days later I had the opportunity to speak at the Hook Spit Junior Anglers Association Seminar in Seabrook about the joys of kayak fishing. We had great turnouts for both events and as always, I had a lot of fun.

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Last but not least, I am excited to join up with good friends Cameron Barghi and Justin Rich, as a member of the Lone Star Beer Fishing Team. Now that Spring is coming back around, I’m hoping to stay more active on the water and my blog. Here’s to a fun 2016.

 

 

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Hook Spit Lone Star Kayak Series 2015 Event #4

October 2015 LSKS

For the first time since last spring, I actually considered putting on a jacket to start the morning. The temps were in the mid 60s with a cool breeze blowing through the air, which was a nice change from the heat we’ve had this summer. Johnathan Meadows and I were fishing the last event of the 2015 Lone Star Kayak Series on this morning and were patiently waiting for the clock to show 6 am so that we could begin our day.

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We were the only two people at our launch, which in my opinion is always a small advantage on tournament day. We wouldn’t have to worry about dodging other anglers that were fishing the tournament or miss out on fishing certain areas because someone else arrived first. I’ve spent 99% of my kayak trips sitting in the seat of a Jackson Cuda 14, but on this particular morning I decided to go with the Cuda LT instead. The marsh we were fishing consists of several dozen small lakes that go on for as far as the eye can see. With the Cuda LT weighing in around 20lbs. lighter and a little over a foot shorter than my Cuda 14, I decided to go with the kayak that had the ability to make sharp turns without needing a lot of space.

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We pushed off into the dark at 6 am and made the short paddle to the first lake we planned to fish. Johnathan started off throwing a topwater while I went with a popping cork and gulp. The plan was to throw different set ups to see what the fish were wanting and then both go with the lure that was producing more fish. It didn’t take long before I had my first bite on the cork which turned out to be a solid 26 ½” redfish. A few minutes later I had my second bite of the day, a chunky 25” red which gave me two fish on the stringer before the sun had a chance to peak over the horizon. Anyone that has ever fished a tournament knows how good I feels to have 12+ lbs. on the stringer within the first hour. It was obvious that it was going to be a popping cork kind of day with the higher than normal tides, so Johnathan put down the topwater and grab his rod with the cork on it. Anyone that’s in the market for a good popping cork rod that won’t break the bank should check out the Hook Spit Zephyr Elite.  At 7′ 2″ you can make those long casts and pop a cork the way its meant to be popped wit the extra fast tip.  It’s a great popping cork rod priced at $159.

Another one for Clint

Another one for Clint

 

It didn’t take long before we figured out the pattern for the day and both had fish two fish on the stringer. With a decent NE wind blowing through the marsh, we used it to our advantage by focusing on all points and small coves on the windblown shoreline. It seemed like every point held at least one fish, along with any small cove that was located on the SE shoreline. The reds would wait on the wind protected side of the points and ambush the bait as the current forced it by or they would focus on the bait that was unwillingly being pushed up against the shoreline by the wind.

At one point we thought we had doubled up on two solid reds, but come to find out, Johnathan had a 27 ¾” red while I had a two foot alligator. It didn’t take long for the gator to realize what was going on and make a mad dash for the protection of the tall grass on the shoreline. He hit the bank and never looked back, eventually slicing through my leader and letting me keep my cork.

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Shortly after the gator broke me off I was able to sightcast a 30” red by standing up in the LT and letting the wind push me towards the tailing fish. I could tell this fish would be out of the slot, but who can resist sightcasting a 30” red in a foot of water. Johnathan was able to catch an oversized red a few hours later as it and a couple of other fish were barreling down the shoreline destroying any bait in their sight.

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We ended the day each catching more 6 lb. reds than we could count, our two oversized fish, and a few larger ones that stayed in the slot and made the trip to the weighin. In the end, Johnathan took home 1st place out of 96 anglers with 15.56 lbs. while I finished 6th with 13.15 lbs. Congratulations goes out to Jason Blackwell who took home Angler of the year honors once again, giving him his third AOY trophy in as many years.

1st and 6th Walking to the table

1st and 6th Walking to the table

 

We had a great day on the water with a couple of nice stringers to end the tournament season. We took full advantage of the benefits that comes with fishing with a friend on tournament day, which I believe helped both us catch more fish than we would have alone

I’d like to give a huge thanks to Werner Paddles, Hook Spit Performance Rods, Buggs Fishing Lures, and Jackson Kayak at this time.  These companies provide me with quality products that have helped me become a better angler over the last several years.  I am truly blessed with the opportunity to represent them and look forward to doing the same when the 2016 tournament season kicks off.

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On a side note, the Lone Star Kayak Series will be back again next year, but the tournament owner and director will change. Dustin Koreba has decided to step down and hand it over to Cameron Barghi and Justin Rich. Cameron and Justin already run the Saltwater Survival Series and have been a part of the LSKS team since it began 4 years ago. We can expect a new beer sponsor and a few new lures, but overall, the things that make this tournament so special will remain the same. Now we all have to fish against Dustin instead of accepting prizes from him.

Conditions:

Wind: 10 mph from the NE

Weather: Sunny skies with temps between 65 and 75 degrees

Tides: Outgoing

Bottom: Mud with occasional patches of grass

Depth: 1-2 feet deep in most areas

Lures:

Bomber Paradise Popper with a Gulp Pogy or Mantis Shrimp on a 1/16 oz. jighead

TTF Killer Flats Minnow on a 1/8 oz. jighead

Rod and Reel:

Popping Cork setup – Daiwa Ballistic EX 2500 on a 7′ 2″ Hook Spit Zephyr Elite

Soft Plastic setup – Shimano Citica on a 6′ 10″ Hook Spit T-N-T

Kayak: Jackson Cuda LT

Paddle: 250 cm Werner Cyrpus: Hooked

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7 Signs You’re “THAT Kayak Fisherman”

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Here’s a good article written by Ben Duchesney over at Kayak Angler Magazine titled: 7 Signs You’re “THAT Kayak Fisherman”.  There is a short excerpt below with a link to the entire article at the end. Whether you’re new to kayak fishing or you’ve been doing it for years, this article is a good read.

7. Don’t Spoil The Newbies

As a general rule, most of the kayak anglers you’ll ever meet are some of the coolest people around, willing to give you the money lure right out of their tackle box, even if it’s their last one. But, every once in a while, you’re going to come across that guy who looks down on new kayak fishermen. News flash, if they are no new kayak fishermen, then there’s no growth, no new gear or new tournaments, no sport of kayak fishing.

The easiest way to not be that kayak fishermen is to just relax, have fun on the water, and be the best ambassador to our sport that you can be. If you see a young angler or an angler that is clearly struggling or very green to the world of kayak fishing, give them a hand. Help them tie their boats to their truck, give them that money lure, or just tell a joke and make them relax. Make sure you remind them, it’s all fun and games. Just don’t have this talk on the boat ramp.

This is an excerpt from the article “7 Signs You’re THAT Kayak Fisherman,” from Kayak Angler magazine’s website. Click here to read the full article

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Hook Spit Lone Star Kayak Series #3 2015

Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

Photo Credit: Jeff Herman

I’ve often heard other tournament anglers say, “If you don’t have your fish by noon, odds are you’re probably not going to get them”. Although I would never give up while fishing a tournament, I have to admit that little saying had crossed my mind a couple times the other day during the Hook Spit Lone Star Kayak Series.

This was the third event of the season, and for the first time this year, I felt pretty good about my odds of doing well. The wind wasn’t bad, we had sunny skies, and I had been on some solid redfish over the last few weeks. Shallow patches of shell and soft mud bottoms had produced a good amount of redfish during the beginning of August, so I decided to stick with what had been working. The majority of my fish had come from a popping cork with gulp, with the rest coming off of a soft plastic that I would use to sight cast singles or pitch into a school.

Plan A was to locate the schools that had been roaming the area in recent weeks, but they were nowhere in sight. After spending a good hour trying to locate the school, I decided to head for shallower water with plenty of shell. I made a long drift across one of the larger lakes, staying within 30 yards of the shoreline, and on the edge of the large shell patches. I sight casted one small redfish along the shoreline before deciding to try the opposite side of the lake, which happened to be the wind protected shoreline.

Photo Credit: Aaron Ferguson

Photo Credit: Aaron Ferguson

As I approached the protected shoreline, I immediately noticed a few mud boils pop up, which was a good sign. I fan casted the area for a few minutes and hooked up with what felt like a solid fish. Five seconds into its first run, it spit the hook, leaving me with a sick feeling in my stomach. I decided to stay on the move, trying to spot more fish to cast at, but didn’t have any luck. I didn’t have much time left to fish, so I decided to work a small channel as a last ditch effort. I had one lower slot red on the stringer after seven hours of hard fishing, so the odds that I would pick up my second fish were looking pretty slim.

The channel only produced a few rat reds so I decided to fish my way back to the truck. I had only made it about 20 yards across the main lake when I spotted a group of birds hovering a few feet above the water about a half mile away. I knew these birds were on a school of fish, and that this was the best chance I’d have at picking up a much needed second fish. I caught up with the school after a five minute paddle and with one cast, I went from 41st to 9th place, thanks to the 26 1/4″ red that pounced on my soft plastic. The fish weighed in at 8.09 lbs. and ended up being the heaviest fish of the whole tournament. My two fish had a combined weight of 11.70 lbs. and helped me bring home a small amount of cash and a few prizes.

The fishing wasn’t hot and heavy on this day like it had been during my previous trips, but that’s how fishing goes. Still, I had a great time and enjoyed visiting with friends at the weighin. We have one event remaining this year in October and I’m looking forward to it.

Photo Credit: Aaron Ferguson

Photo Credit: Aaron Ferguson

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FishHide Sportswear Review

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Like most anglers, when I choose my gear, there are several factors that influence my decision. When selecting lures I look at size, color, and action. When picking out a rod, I focus on the length, power, action, and components used to build it. If I’m looking at a new reel, I want something that is small and lightweight, with the ability to handle big redfish and function properly around saltwater. The same thought process occurs when I choose the clothes I fish in. Not only do I want them to last and look good, I want them to serve a purpose as well.

Over the past 5 years, I’ve purchased just about every “fishing shirt” out there with mixed feelings on each of them. A few months back, at the Houston Fishing Show, I was able to get my hands one of the FishHide Sportswear shirts that has quickly become my favorite shirt to wear while on the water. Photo Mar 01-310690043_829848303742347_2596004534882066710_nNot only is the shirt made from high quality material that will last for many years, it has several added features that most anglers will find useful.

The first thing most people will notice about this shirt, is the large strip of bright orange material located across back and under both sleeves. It’s no secret that hunters wear bright orange clothing to make themselves visible to other hunter’s while in the woods right? Well, the FishHide shirt does the same thing for anglers on the water. As boats travel at high speeds across the open bay, it can be difficult for them to see kayakers and wade fishermen that are in their path, especially in low light situations. With the FishHide shirt, you have the added protection of bright orange that is clearly visible to others. The large strip on the back of the shirt makes it easy for boats that are approaching from the rear to see you, while the strips under each sleeve become visible when you raise your arms above your head and wave them back and forth. As someone who spends the majority of his time paddling a kayak around the bay, visibility is very important to me.

Protection from the sun is another feature I look for in my shirts. For as long as I can remember, I have not been able to stand sunscreen. I don’t like the way it feels on my skin and I am constantly forgetting to reapply it every few hours. My lack of reapplying (or not applying in the first place) has left me with several bad sunburns over the year, which we all know can lead to skin cancer. My solution to this problem became long sleeve shirts made from quick drying micro mesh material that is breathable. This is the same material the FishHide company uses to make their shirts, so not only do I not have to worry about catching a sunburn, the material keeps me cool and dry the entire day, which is important here in Texas where temperatures reach the 100 degree mark on most summer days.

The neck, face, and hands are three other areas that seem to receive a lot of attention from the sun. Gloves and a buff are how the majority of anglers choose to solve this problem, which is the same method I use. An added bonus to FishHide shirts is that they come with a buff and set of gloves built in to the shirt. The buff is attached to the collar of the shirt, while the gloves are readily available because of a thumbhole at the end of each sleeve. These built in gloves are great for kayakers while paddling from spot to spot, and for anglers that want to protect the tops of their hands while fishing. The buff does a great job of protecting your neck since it is attached to the shirt. Being attached to the shirt helps to eliminate the small area at the bottom of your neck where a normal buff always seems to leave a small gap between it and your shirt. So if you always seem to realize that you left one, or both of these back at the truck shortly after launching, the FishHide shirt can provide you with an easy solution to your problem.

Each shirt also comes standard with two chest pockets that can be used to store a few items that you would like to have close by. Under the pocket on the right hand side of your chest, you’ll find a kill switch loop which can be useful to anglers that own a power boat. Inside that same pocket, you’ll find an attached piece of lens cloth that allows you to wipe away water, moisture, and smudges from your polarized sunglasses. While in relatively shallow water, the cloth stays dry throughout the day and is always within reach when you need to give your glasses or GoPro lens a good wipe down.

Shirts are available in a variety of sizes and colors as well. handsupRanging from small to XXXL, with over a dozen colors to choose from, anglers have plenty of options, including four camo patterns and nine solid colors.

These shirts provide anglers with a good combination of comfort, style, and safety while on the water and they are made to last. The additional features like the built in buff, gloves, and lens cloth eliminate the need to carry extra items, which gives you a few less things to worry about.

To see all available colors or to place an order, visit them online at http://www.fishhidesportswear.com

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First Kayak Trip of 2015

Grant and I made a trip to Galveston yesterday to explore a new area and try and locate some fish.  I have virtually scouted this spot many times with Google Earth but always seem to talk myself out of making the long paddle that is required to reach and fish it.  The winds were predicted to stay relatively low and the temperature was going to climb into the mid 60s by noon so this was as good a day as any to put in some miles.

The plan was to search for trout on the way out but they weren’t really around.  Once we made the 5 mile paddle to our intended destination we focused on a deeper channel for the first few hours before moving over to the nearby mud/shell mix.  We had no luck in the channels, mainly due to the fact that by the time we reached it the sun was straight overhead, quickly heating the mud/shell mix and the water around it.  The reds had moved out of the deeper water and were sitting pretty shallow when we found them.  All of our fish were within close proximity to the deeper water (4-8 feet deep) sitting in about 2 feet of water with a soft mud bottom covered with a small amount of scattered shell.  This has been a constant pattern all winter long that will continue over the next month or two.  Find the mud shell/mix near deeper water, and you find the fish.

This was one of those days when I kayak you can stand in was key to catching fish.  While sitting, the fish were difficult to spot.  While standing, you could see them about 10-12 yards away and make a short pitch to them for an immediate hookup.  All fish were sight casted and were between 23 and 26 inches. Grant did manage to pull one that was a little over 30 inches for our largest of the day.  We also picked up a few trout where the deeper water met up with the shallow stuff and I spotted a 35″  black drum that was not interested in my trout killer.  All fish were released to fight another day.  Enjoy the video above since I didn’t take any pics on this trip.

Conditions:

Wind: 5 mph from North switching out of the east around noon

Weather: Mid 60s with sunny skies.

Tides: Outgoing until noon and then incoming

Bottom: Mud & shell mix

Visibility: Crystal clear

Depth: 2 feet but near channels that were 4-8 feet deep

Lure: Texas Trout Killer on a 1/4th oz jig head (Plum White)

Rod: 6′ 9″ Hook Spit Pitch Fork

Reel: Shimano Citica

Kayak: Jackson Cuda 14

Paddle: 250 cm Werner Cyrpus: Hooked

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January 2015 Issue of The Fisherman’s Journal

TFJ-Jan2015

 

The January 2015 issue of The Fisherman’s Journal is now available at the link below.  Be sure to check out page 24 to read my article “10 Tips to Defeat the Wind While Kayak Fishing”.

 

http://thefishermansjournal.com/blog/2015/01/06/the-january-2015-issue-of-the-fishermans-journal/

 

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