Posts Tagged With: lone star beer

2016 Lone Star Kayak Series Event #3

IMG_0778

This past weekend I spent my Saturday fishing the 3rd event of the Lone Star Kayak Series.  After a rough outing during the last event, where I only caught one redfish thirty minutes before having to leave, I thought for sure that I had put myself out of the running for angler of the year. With that in mind, the plan was to go for two big bites and not play it safe.

I spent the majority of my summer chasing trout in Galveston bay instead of the marsh for redfish, so I basically had to gamble on where to fish.  We had about ten straight days of rain leading up to the event, so getting out to prefish was not an option.  I picked my location based on past results and arrived at the launch with a little less than ten minutes to unload my kayak and load up my gear.  By the time I finished situating my gear and parking my truck, it was 6 am and time to go.

I made the three mile paddle to the area I planned to fish and began working the shoreline, focusing on the various points, drains, and coves along the way.  I started off with a STX Tackle Popping Cork and Gulp Mantis Shrimp, but after an hour with no bites, I switched over to a Bone Skitterwalk for a while.  After an hour of continuous dog walking and no luck, I went back to my popping cork for a while.

TroutSupportAd2

I picked up a 17″ trout at one of the drains I was fishing, but that wasn’t the fish I was looking for.  I kept grinding it out with my cork, hoping that I would come across a hungry redfish, but a bite never came.  I finally circled back around and started the same drift again.  Without much action during the first few hours, I decided to drag my popping cork and gulp behind me while working my topwater in front of me.  I figured two lures in the water were better than one on a day like this.  Ten minutes into my drift, I hear my cork rod screaming and reach back to grab my rod.  I’m thinking that I have a lower slot red, before finally getting enough line in to see the slime near my cork.  It ended up being a 4 lb gaftop, which was way worse than the previous trout I’d caught.

At this point I’m running a little low on time and have to be back at the truck early anyways because of a previously planned event.  I finally decided to throw in the towel and head back to the truck.  After paddling about a mile back towards the launch, I decide to stop off at one last spot for a desperate shot at finding a couple of fish.  I pull out the Skitterwalk and make a long cast down the wind protected shoreline and start walking the dog back towards me.  Twenty seconds later, my lure gets clobbered by a solid redfish and I can’t believe it.  Five hours straight of non stop casting tops and corks with no fish, and on the very first cast on the way back to the truck, I’m on the board with a chunky 25.5″ red.

image1

I string the fish and continue working the area.  Two casts later, and I have another chunky red on my stringer at 26.25″.  A half a dozen more casts, and I stick a thick 26.75″ red, giving me what feels like 14+ lbs. between my two heaviest fish.  I work the area for another twenty minutes, hoping to find an upgrade for the smaller of my two fish, but time is not on my side and I still have a two mile paddle to reach the truck.  I want to take it nice and slow to keep my fish alive for the half pound bonus, so I head in a little earlier than I’d like.

2nd place LSKS _3 2016

Because of my previously planned event, I was forced to weigh my fish and immediately get back on the road.  I received a text message a few hours later informing me that I had finished in 2nd place out of 96 anglers with 15.02 pounds, which included my 1/2 lb. bonus.  This finish brought me back into the AOY race, by jumping into a three way tie for first, followed closely but two others.

AOY

The last event of the season is on October 8th, and will determine who takes angler of the year honors.  With that title on the line, it’s going to make it difficult to really enjoy the last event.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2016 Lone Star Kayak Series Event #1

DSC_0058 copy

The first event of the 2016 Lone Star Kayak Series kicked off this past weekend, with the weigh-in held at the HarborWalk Marina in Hitchcock, TX. The last couple of April events have not been very kind to me, with only one fish to show for my efforts in both 2014 and 2015. I was determined to turn things around this year so I made sure that I was able to pre-fish before the actual event. After rummaging through some of my old fishing logs from past April trips, I took a day off from work and hit the water 10 days before the event.

TroutSupportAd2

I took my time that morning and didn’t get on the water till nearly 7 am. The wind on this day was non-existent, so I tied on a super spook jr. and an oval popping cork with gulp. I started off with the cork, giving it gentle pops across the glassy water. After a good 15 minutes with the cork and no bites, I made the switch over to the super spook jr in hopes of finding a few hungry topwater fish. On the very first cast, I watched as a 30” redfish appeared 5 yards behind my lure, pushing a large wake with its head as it made its approach. As excited as I was, (because I knew what was about to happen) I continued walking the dog as if I hadn’t seen a thing. The red inhaled my spook, and a few short minutes later I had the fish in my kayak. A 30” red was not what I was after, but it let me know that I was in the right spot for big fish. I decided to stick with the spook jr and had another red in the kayak 15 minutes later. This one measured 29”, so at least heading in the right direction. These two fish were followed by 28.5”, 23”, and 27 7/8” reds, not to mention a 4 foot gar also caught on topwater. I decided to explore a few different areas before heading home, but didn’t really fish much more after that. I had found the fish I was looking for, and even though I was 10 days out from the tournament, there was no reason to stick around and beat up on these fish.

IMG_8986

IMG_8992

IMG_8993

IMG_8995

IMG_8997

IMG_9015

I felt pretty confident that I could pull some good weight on tournament day from this spot, as long as nothing crazy happened between now and the 23rd. Of course, this being April an all, the weather went a little crazy. Lots and lots of rain flooded all of the rivers that lead to the gulf and we faced crazy high tides from the strong SE wind. As Saturday approached, I started second guessing myself and wondered if I should blindly fish a spot that would be less effected by the fresh water. Luckily, I decided to stick with my original plan.

On the day of the tournament, Johnathan and I launched our kayaks with half a dozen other anglers. We were all sitting around waiting for our clocks to say 6 am, and once they did, we were off and running. I reached the area I had pre-fished and immediately began throwing my Bone Super Spook Jr. I hadn’t made more than a dozen casts before a relish exploded on my lure. I fought the fish for a few minutes before finally getting a good luck at it. Its head came out of the water and I couldn’t see my spook Jr., so I knew I had a good hookup. After netting and stringing the fish, I laid it across the ruler and gave its tail a pinch and a swipe. 27 5/8” with plenty of time left to find my second fish. I felt great at this point and continued throwing the spook for another hour without any luck. I made the decision to switch over to my popping cork to see if it would produce. The winds were similar to my pre-fish day, but the tide was running nearly a foot and a half higher. So high in fact, that I was unable to crabwalk the area like I normally would.

I worked the shorelines, points, and pinches without a bite. I finally came across a decent sized drain where I immediately hooked up with something monstrous. My cork went under, drag started peeling off my reel, and all I could do was watch, as whatever had taken my gulp rounded a corner and finally broke me off. After a few choice cusswords, I thought about it and decided that it didn’t matter what I had just lost, because it wasn’t going to be a 20-28” red anyway. I tied a jighead back onto my cork and picked up a flounder a few casts later. I kept moving around, focusing on the points and grass lines without much luck. I approached another drain, and made a cast near it with my cork. Just like before, my cork disappeared after a few pops, and I had on another fish. It took a while to get a good look at the fish, which ended up being a 31” red. It was nearly 10 am at this point and that great feeling of having a solid fish at 7 am was starting to fade.

We deiced to leave this lake and try a few other spots out. Lucky for us, this move ended up paying off. Johnathan picked up a stout 24” red that weighed a little over 6 lbs. by tossing his cork into a drain. At this point I decided to move a little more and cast a little less. I worked my way around the lakes and only stopped to cast if I saw something to cast at or if I came to a drain. I ended up picking up a 25” red at the 3rd drain I came to, and that helped relieve some of the pressure of showing up with only one fish. At this point I decided to slowly fish my way back towards the truck. I had hoped to upgrade my smaller fish as I went that direction, but never had another bite.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I arrived at the weighin a little early, but that just gave me a little time to hang out with friends that I hadn’t seen in a while. When it was all said and done, I had placed 6th out of 147 anglers and finally broken my string of one fish April events.

IMG_0256

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_0559

 

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Spring Break Marsh Trip

LS 6 Redfish resized

One of the perks of being a teacher is having long breaks away from work throughout the year.  Spring break is one of those times, so David and I decided to squeeze in a midweek trip . Since we live pretty close to one another, we decided to meet up at his house and ride together. We made the traditional stop at Bucee’s to get a little breakfast before making it down to the coast.

image1-4

We ended up launching around 7:15 am and began the day throwing topwaters against the grasslines and over large patches of grass without much luck. We could see bait moving around, but none of it seemed to be fleeing for its life. Once we made it to the shallow stuff, we were blowing out redfish every 10 yards or so, but not one of them were interested in our lures.

Even though we weren’t getting any bites, there were fish in the area, so we decided to grind it out in hopes that we would eventually convince a few to eat or that they would all turn on and begin feeding. After two hours of throwing tops, plastics, spoons, buggs, and everything else on the kayak, David finally sight casted a redfish that was crawling along the grass lines with a Bugg. About 5 minutes later, I spotted one on the shoreline doing the same thing and made a cast at the fish. My Bugg landed on the edge of the grass, but came out and landed near the fish. He turned on my bugg, made me think that he ate it, but succeeded in fooling me.

While David and I were discussing our plan of attack, I picked up a 22″ marsh trout after seeing a small tern that was pretty interested in a certain section of the water. After a few pics, we continued working the shorelines and that turned out to be the trick. The fish that were 10+ yards off the shorelines were not interested in our lures at all, but the ones cruising along the grass were hungry enough for us to get a handful of bites. We decided to split up in order to maximize the amount of the grass lines we could work and meet back up later.

image1-3 copy 2

image2-3 copy

I sent David a text an hour later to let him know that I had caught my limit of reds. He said he was 1 fish short of a limit and had lost a couple that would have completed it. I worked my way back towards him and picked up a few more fish along with way by continuing to focus on the grass lines. When I finally caught back up with David, he had strung his 3rd red and had caught a few extra as well. We explored the area a bit more and finally decided to call it a day. We were still spooking fish that were laid up, but they just weren’t interested enough in eating for us to continue grinding it out.

image3-2

I caught my trout on a 1/4 oz. Curl Tail Bugg in Electric Chicken and the reds came off of a 1/4 oz. Curl Tail in Blue Crab (My all time favorite color). David caught a few of his on buggs and a few on paddle tails.

image2-5

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.